INTRODUCTION

1. The Twenty-Second ASEAN Ministerial Meeting was -held in Bandar Seri Begawan from 3 to 4 July 1989. The Meeting was formally opened by His Majesty Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah, the Sultan and Yang Di-Pertuan of Brunei Darussalam.

2. The Meeting was attended by His Royal Highness Prince Mohamed Bolkiah, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Brunei Darussalam; His Excellency Mr. Ali Alatas, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia; His Excellency Dato’ Haji Abu Hassan bin Haji Omar, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Malaysia; His Excellency Mr. Raul S. Manglapus, Secretary of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of the Philippines; His Excellency Mr. Wong Kan Seng, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Minister for Community Development of the Republic of Singapore; His Excellency Air Chief Marshal Siddhi Savetsila, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Thailand, and their respective delegations.

3. His Excellency Mr. Roderick Yong, Secretary – General of the ASEAN Secretariat, and his staff also attended the Meeting.

4. His Excellency Mr. Sebulon Kulu, the Special Representative of the Government of Papua New Guinea attended the Open Session as Observer.

5. His Royal Highness Prince Mohamed Bolkiah, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Brunei Darussalam chaired the Meeting. His Excellency Mr. Ali Alatas, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia, was elected Vice-Chairman.

OPENING ADDRESS

6. In his Inaugural Address, His Majesty Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah Muizzaddin Waddaullah, the Sultan and Yang Di Pertuan Negara Brunei Darussalam noted the latest developments that had taken place in the region. The easing of tension among the superpowers had gained momentum as shown by the recent Sino-Soviet Summit. The moves towards peace had permitted the attempts by the United Nations and regional organizations to resolve problems which, in the last decade, seemed insoluble.

7. His Majesty continued that in Afghanistan, the Soviets had withdrawn their troops. In Namibia, the terms for a settlement had been agreed. The Iran-Iraq War had stopped and the process of reconciliation continued. Turning to the region, His Majesty stated that efforts by ASEAN to resolve the Kampuchean problem went on.

8. On the Kampuchean problem, His Majesty stated that the JIM process had helped to get the four Kampuchean parties to meet in order to resolve this problem. His Majesty was confident that with more efforts by all parties, the problem of Kampuchea could finally be resolved. In this case, efforts could be concentrated on turning the region from a “region of conflict” to a region of peace and economic development and cooperation.

9. On the international economic situation, His Majesty noted that the world seemed to be moving towards the formation of trading blocs and protectionism. His Majesty expressed that as peaceful political climate was being created, economic cooperation should also be fostered so that free and fair trade could exist.

10. His Majesty also stressed the need to have an enlarged intra ASEAN cooperation especially in the economic fields. ASEAN should, through wise policies, prevent the internal aspects of its economic cooperation from developing into economic conflict. On the other hand, the external aspects of ASEAN economic cooperation should bind ASEAN collectively in dealing with the efforts to implement the decisions taken at the Third Meeting of the ASEAN Heads of Government in Manila in 1987.

11. In emphasizing ASEAN as a regional organization, His Majesty stated that ASEAN had been the pillar of the region’s harmony and stability which emphasized good neighbourliness among member states. To ensure that ASEAN continued to have a peaceful region, continued commitment to ASEAN should be instilled into all the peoples of ASEAN, especially the succeeding generation. His Majesty urged that various programmes for youth should be devised at all levels. Through their experience of working together, the young people could at an early stage begin to build that foundation of neighbourly relations based on friendship, mutual trust and confidence. In this way, commitment to ASEAN would be renewed and passed on to future generations, thus ensuring continued stability in the region.

SINO-SOVIET SUMMIT

12. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the recent Sino-Soviet Summit held in Beijing in May 1989. Although it was limited in scope, it is expected to accelerate the improvement in relations among the major powers. They were of the view that the normalization of Sino-Soviet relations would further reduce international tension and create favourable atmosphere for settlement of regional problems.

SITUATION IN KAMPUCHEA

13. The Foreign Ministers reviewed current political developments and expressed their hope that the prevailing political atmosphere would contribute to a comprehensive and durable political settlement of the Kampuchean problem, which had been caused by Vietnam’s military occupation of Kampuchea in violation of the United Nations Charter and international law, of the right of the Kampuchea people to self-determination, and of the principle of noninterference in internal affairs of a sovereign state.

14. In this respect, the Foreign Ministers noted the announcement by Vietnam that it would withdraw its troops from Kampuchea by 30 September 1989 as a positive development. However, the Foreign Ministers stressed that the Vietnamese withdrawal must be conducted in a comprehensive political settlement with external and internal aspects of the Kampuchean problem integrally linked. The Foreign Ministers reaffirmed their belief in the need for the establishment of an effective international control mechanism to supervise and verify the withdrawal and an effective international peace-keeping force under the UN auspices to maintain peace and order pending the holding of free elections.

15. Meanwhile, the Foreign Ministers called on Vietnam and the Kampuchean parties to continue to exercise flexibility and to be more accommodating in order to reach a comprehensive political settlement of the Kampuchean problem. In this regard, they stressed the importance of the talks among the Kampuchean parties to pave the way for national reconciliation in Kampuchea. The Foreign Ministers once again reaffirmed their support for the Coalition Government of Democratic Kampuchea (CGDK) under the Presidency of His Royal Highness Prince Norodom Sihanouk. The Foreign Ministers emphasized the preponderant role of His Royal Highness Prince Norodom Sihanouk in the settlement of the Kampuchean problem and welcomed his resumption of the Presidency of the CGDK.

16. The Foreign Ministers noted with appreciation the French initiative to convene an International Conference on Kampuchea. An international conference should be complementary to efforts taken by ASEAN over the last ten years to find a comprehensive settlement to the Kampuchean problem through the UN, the JIM process and other modalities. It should build upon the issues and principles already discussed through the JIM process and enshrined in the relevant UN resolutions. The Foreign Ministers stressed that the objective of an international conference should be to reach a comprehensive political settlement.

17. The Foreign Ministers further expressed their appreciation to the international community for its continued support of the CGDK in the UN and other international fora. The Foreign Ministers also acknowledged the contribution made by all concerned countries in the sustained efforts in seeking a comprehensive political solution of the Kampuchean problem. They recorded their gratitude to His Excellency Javier Perez de Cuellar, the United Nations Secretary-General for his efforts in finding a comprehensive, just and durable settlement of the Kampuchean problem. They expressed their thanks to His Excellency, Mr. Rafeeuddin Ahmed, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs in Southeast Asia, and welcomed his presence at the 22nd ASEAN Ministerial Meeting. Recognising the efforts of the ICK Ad Hoc Committee the Foreign Ministers also expressed their appreciation to its Chairman, Madam Claude Absa Diallo of Senegal and the members of the ICK Ad Hoc Committee. They also welcomed the presence of the Ambassador Diallo and her colleagues at the Twenty-Second ASEAN Ministerial Meeting.

JAKARTA INFORMAL MEETING (JIM)

18. The Foreign Ministers reviewed ASEAN’s diplomatic efforts in bringing about a comprehensive and durable political settlement of the Kampuchean problem which has brought suffering to the- Kampuchean people and has been a major cause of instability in the Southeast Asian region. They reiterated the need to solve this problem through political means thereby contributing to the establishment of regional peace and stability. They reaffirmed their commitment to continue the efforts in seeking a comprehensive political settlement in accordance with the relevant UNGA resolutions on the Situation in Kampuchea.

19. As an important regional initiative, the JIM process succeeded in identifying key areas of agreements and laying basic framework for the political settlement. The JIM meetings, in particular, were positive developments contributing towards the process of a peaceful settlement of the Kampuchean problem. The Foreign Ministers called on the conflicting parties and Vietnam to continue to exercise flexibility and to be compromising in the endeavour to find a durable and comprehensive political settlement of the problem. The Foreign Ministers noted the results of the meeting between His Royal Highness Prince Norodom Sihanouk and Mr. Hun Sen as well as between Mr. Son Sann and Mr. Hun Sen in Jakarta, 2 – 3 May 1989.

20. The Foreign Ministers expressed their appreciation to Indonesia as ASEAN’s interlocutor with Vietnam, for initiating the JIM process that has brought together for the first time all parties directly involved in the Kampuchean problem and other concerned countries in the region. The Foreign Ministers expressed their sincere appreciation to His Excellency Mr. Ali Alatas for his tenacity and untiring efforts in successfully organizing the JIM meetings.

INDOCHINESE REFUGEES

21. The Foreign Ministers recalled their Joint Statements issued in Bangkok on 4 July 1988 and in Bandar Seri Begawan on 21 January 1989, respectively, which called for the convening of an International Conference on Indochinese Refugees (ICIR) and the formulation of a new comprehensive plan of action to address the Indochinese refugee problem.

22. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the successful conclusion of the International Conference on Indochinese Refugees, which was convened by the United Nations Secretary-General in Geneva between 13 – 14 June 1989 under the Presidency of the Foreign Minister of Malaysia.

23. The Foreign Ministers expressed their sincere appreciation to the United Nations Secretary-General for his understanding of the Indochinese refugee crisis and for his assistance in convening the International Conference, and also to the UN Under-Secretary General Rafeeuddin Ahmed, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugee and all countries concerned for their cooperation and contribution toward the success of the International Conference.

24. The Foreign Ministers noted that the International Conference had adopted by consensus the draft Declaration and Comprehensive Plan of Action (CPA), which had been previously endorsed by the Preparatory Meeting for the International Conference on Indochinese Refugees at Senior Officials’ level in Kuala Lumpur from 7 to 9 March 1989.

25. The Foreign Ministers were of the view that measures stipulated in the CPA are interrelated and mutually reinforcing and should be implemented by all parties concerned, having regard for their national positions, in their totality. They also reaffirmed the willingness of the ASEAN countries to work closely with all parties concerned to ensure the successful implementation of the CPA.

26. The Foreign Ministers reiterated that speedy resettlement of all Vietnamese in camps in the ASEAN countries before the Cut-off Dates in March 1989 within three-year timeframe and of all those determined to be refugees without residual problem to ASEAN countries, the marked reduction of the influx of asylum-seekers, and viable solutions to deal with all those new arrivals who are determined as non-refugees and hence are not eligible for third-country resettlement, are the crucial components for the durability of the solution to the Indochinese refugee problem.

27. The Foreign Ministers called upon all countries and international organizations concerned to render full cooperation to these endeavours, having regard for their national positions, including the setting up of an UNHCR-administered Reintegration Fund. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the proposal of the Philippine Government to host a Regional Resettlement Processing Centre for Indochinese Refugees in first asylum countries, subject to the four conditions stated at the ICIR.

28. The Foreign Ministers also noted with satisfaction that some resettlement countries had announced their definite intakes of present camp populations before the announced Cut-off Dates in Southeast Asian region for resettlement within three years, and, in this connection, also urged other potential resettlement countries to help resettle these present camp populations in the spirit of international burden sharing.

29. The Foreign Ministers also urged Vietnam to assume the responsibility towards its own citizens and, in so doing, to accept back all those Vietnamese who are determined as non-refugees and hence not eligible for third country resettlement.

30. The Foreign Ministers stressed that, in addition to the Kampuchean issue, Vietnam’s sincerity and effective measures toward the durable solution to the problem of Vietnamese boat people are also vital for the enhancement of the overall cooperation, understanding and good neighbourliness between ASEAN countries and Vietnam as well as regional peace and harmony.

ZOPFAN AND SEANWFZ

31. The Foreign Ministers reaffirmed ASEAN’s determination to work towards the realization of the Zone of Peace, Freedom and Neutrality (ZOPFAN) in Southeast Asia. They reiterated the decision of the 3rd ASEAN Summit to draw up an appropriate strategy with clear targets and objectives to demonstrate progress towards the early realization of ZOPFAN. They also directed the Senior Officials to continue considering the concept of Southeast Asia Nuclear Weapon Free Zone (SEANWFZ) as a component of a ZOPFAN, with a view to complete the drafting as soon as possible a treaty on the SEANWFZ, taking into account all its implications. They agreed that ASEAN could undertake consultations, at an appropriate time, with other states on primary elements of SEANWFZ for the purpose of obtaining their support for the Zone.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIONS ON THE DECISIONS OF THE THIRD MEETING OF THE ASEAN HEADS OF GOVERNMENT

32. The Foreign Ministers reviewed the implementation of the decisions of the Third Meeting of the ASEAN Heads of Government. While noting the progress that has been achieved in this regard, they stressed the need to pursue the implementation of these decisions, as well as the Programme of Action adopted by the Third Meeting of the ASEAN Heads of Government, more, vigorously and expeditiously.

33. Consistent with the decision of the Third Meeting of the ASEAN Heads of Government, the Foreign Ministers approved the ASEAN Standing Committee’s recommendation for ASEAN to establish sectoral dialogue relations with the Republic of Korea (ROK). The Foreign Ministers agreed that the sectoral dialogue relations should initially concentrate on the areas of trade, investment and tourism, with the possibility of expanding the relations to include other areas such as development cooperation, transfer of technology and human resources development (HRD). They agreed that the ASEAN Directors General would discuss with the ROK officials details relating to the modalities of establishing the sectoral dialogue relations and other relevant matters.

34. In line with the decision of the Third Meeting of the ASEAN Heads of Government to further enhance ASEAN cooperation and to make the ASEAN organizational machinery more effective, the Foreign Ministers approved the recommendations of the ASEAN Standing Committee on the revised organizational structure, duties and responsibilities of the Home-Based-Staff (HBS) of the ASEAN Secretariat. The Foreign Ministers agreed to the creation of the post of Deputy Secretary-General (DSG) of the ASEAN Secretariat. The Foreign Ministers agreed that the DSG would assume office in mid-1990 for a tenure of three years on a rotational basis in alphabetical order. It was further agreed that the first DSG would be nominated by Singapore. Accordingly, the Foreign Ministers signed a Protocol Amending the Agreement on the Establishment of the ASEAN Secretariat to make these changes.

REVIEW OF ASEAN COOPERATION

35. In reviewing the progress made in ASEAN cooperation over the past year, the Foreign Ministers noted with satisfaction the various programmes and activities undertaken to promote intra-ASEAN cooperation.

36. The Foreign Ministers expressed their appreciation for the new initiatives undertaken by the meetings of other ASEAN Ministers to enhance ASEAN cooperation. The Ministers noted with satisfaction the results of the Twentieth ASEAN Economic Ministers Meeting, Pattaya, Thailand, 17-18 October 1988; the Seventh Meeting of the ASEAN Labour Ministers, Bali, Indonesia, 13-14 October 1988; the Tenth Meeting of the ASEAN Ministers on Agriculture and Forestry, Kuala Lumpur, 20-22 October 1988; the Fourth Meeting of the ASEAN Ministers for Science and Technology, Manila, 30-31 January 1989; and the First Conference of ASEAN Ministers Responsible for Information, Jakarta, 24-25 May 1989. These Ministerial meetings had given policy directions and recommendations to enhance ASEAN cooperation in their respective fields.

37. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding on the Brand-to-Brand Complementation in Automotive Industry by the ASEAN Economic Ministers. They noted that this scheme would contribute to the strengthening and broadening of base of industrial sectors of member countries as well as to the expansion of intra-ASEAN trade. The Foreign Ministers noted with satisfaction the implementation of the country programmes for 1988 on the improvement of the ASEAN Preferential Trading Arrangements (PTA). As for the 1989 programme, the Foreign Ministers expressed the hope that all countries would implement their ‘1989 programmes expeditiously. The Foreign Ministers also noted that the Agreement on the Establishment of the ASEAN Tourism Information Centre (ATIC) was signed in Kuala Lumpur on 26 September 1988. The Foreign Ministers also noted the progress made on the implementation of the Memorandum of Understanding on Standstill and Rollback of Non-Tariff Barriers and also the reduction in the percentage of ASEAN content requirement. The Foreign Ministers noted that ASEAN had set up an Ad Hoc Working Group of Experts on Commodities to implement the eight-point new initiatives to enhance intra-ASEAN cooperation on commodities. The initial guidelines and plan of action had been drawn up, inter-alia, the establishment of ASEAN Data Bank for Commodities, joint ASEAN market development studies and the division of work among members to carry out specific tasks.

38. The Foreign Ministers noted the Report of the Seventh ASEAN Labour Ministers’ Meeting and expressed satisfaction over the progress made. They further noted that an ASEAN project proposal on the informal sector would be formulated to address the need to increase the prospects of employment for the unemployed and the underemployed.

39. The Foreign Ministers noted that the Fourth Meeting of the ASEAN Ministers for Science and Technology had adopted the ASEAN Plan of Action on Science and Technology (Plan). The Plan envisaged to strengthen and enhance the capability of ASEAN in science and technology so that it could promote economic development and help achieve a high quality of life for the people of ASEAN. The Foreign Ministers also noted that an ASEAN Science and Technology Fund would be set up for the purpose of implementing research .and development programmes on Science and Technology.

40. The Foreign Ministers noted that the First Conference of ASEAN Ministers Responsible for information, Jakarta, 24-25 May 1989, issued a Declaration of ASEAN Ministers Responsible for Information. The Declaration emphasized the importance of the principle of press freedom with social responsibility and called for the strengthening of ASEAN cooperation in the areas of press, television, radio, film and video with the aim for promoting greater awareness of ASEAN among its people.

41. In view of the role pf the youth in ASEAN as a productive force and beneficiaries for development and regional cooperation, the Foreign Ministers requested the ASEAN Committee on Social Development (COSD) to formulate and implement programmes of youth. They noted the creation of the ASEAN Sub-Committee on Labour Affairs and the Sub-Committee on Education under the purview of COSD which would address the issues and programme of action pertaining of these two important areas. They also welcomed the creation of the ASEAN Senior Officials on the Environment as an important step designed to address environmental issues and sustainable development.

MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE INITIATIVE FOR THE PHILIPPINES / PHILIPPINE ASSISTANCE PROGRAMME (MAI / PAP)

42. The Foreign Ministers noted with great satisfaction the successful launching of the Multilateral Assistance Initiative for the Philippines/ Philippine Assistance Programme (MAI / PAP) at the meeting of the enlarged consultative group for the Philippines, being held in Tokyo on July 3 to 5 1989. This is a manifestation of the support of the international community for the efforts and progress being made by the Philippine Government to achieve economic recovery vital to the stability and security of the region as a whole.

PRIVATE SECTOR AND NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

43. The Foreign Ministers noted with satisfaction that the private sector in ASEAN and in the Dialogue Countries through their respective Business Councils had participated actively in the dialogue partners, in line with the decision of the Third Meeting of the ASEAN Heads of Government. The Foreign Ministers expressed the hope that the involvement of the private sector should be further encouraged. Members of the private sector had participated at the Eighth ASEAN – US Dialogue, the Fifth ASEAN – Canada Joint Cooperation Committee and the Twelfth ASEAN Australia Forum.

DRUGS

44. The Foreign Ministers noted with satisfaction the continued cooperation and collaboration among the drug agencies in ASEAN in their joint efforts to control and prevent the scourge of the drug menace in the region. They hoped that such assistance would continue to be given in the future. The Foreign Ministers also called for closer and continued cooperation among Non-Governmental Organizations in the field of preventive education as well as in the treatment and rehabilitation of drug addicts.

45. The Foreign Ministers commended the concerted and determined efforts of the international community to combat the drug problem and expressed their satisfaction over the adoption and signing of the United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances in Vienna in December 1988.

46. The Foreign Ministers reviewed the current situation of the drug problem and reiterated their serious concern over the changing trend of drug abuse and its adverse consequences. They also expressed concern over the emergence of the new phenomenon of drug abuse in association with the incidence of the acquired immunity deficiency syndrome (AIDS) which constituted a grave threat to the well-being of the World Community. The Foreign Ministers, therefore, called for special attention and combined efforts to overcome the problem.

47. Recalling the ASEAN Declaration of Principles to Combat the Abuse of Narcotic Drugs of 1976, the Foreign Ministers reiterated their firm determination to embark upon closer cooperative efforts to control drug abuse and illicit trafficking in the region.

ASEAN – PACIFIC COOPERATION ON HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT (APC-HRD)

48. The Foreign Ministers noted that the Ad Hoc Working Group on APC-HRD had been reactivated to review the existing project proposals and to consider new project proposals. The Foreign Ministers endorsed the amended guidelines on APC-HRD as recommended by the ASEAN Directors-General to the ASEAN Senior Officials Meeting. They reiterated the importance of continued assistance from the Pacific Dialogue Countries for the successful implementation of APC-HRD project.

COOPERATION WITH DIALOGUE COUNTRIES AND OTHER ORGANIZATION

49. The Foreign Ministers noted the implementation of the decisions of the Third Meeting of the ASEAN Heads of Government pertaining to ASEAN’s relationships with its Dialogue Countries: Australia, Canada, the European Community, Japan, New Zealand and the United States. ASEAN’s cooperative relations with the UNDP had also progressed. The Foreign Ministers expressed their appreciation to the Dialogue Countries and the UNDP for their continued support. The Foreign Ministers reiterated the importance of maintaining the regional character of all ASEAN projects assisted by the Dialogue Countries and the UNDP.

50. The Foreign Ministers expressed satisfaction over the results of the Twelfth ASEAN – Australia Forum, Perth, Australia, 15-17 May 1989. The Foreign Ministers noted that the second phase of the ASEAN – Australia Economic Cooperation Programme (AAECP) would commence in July 1989 for a five-year period. They also noted that projects and activities to be conducted under the AAECP Phase II would focus on the areas of trade and investment promotion, science and technology and agro-based projects with special reference to HRD. They further noted the increasing role played by the private sectors of ASEAN and Australia in the promotion of trade investment.

51. On Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations, the Foreign Ministers reaffirmed the need for ASEAN to maximize efforts to enhance cooperation to ensure that the interests of ASEAN and Australia would be reflected in the final agreements, particularly on agriculture and tropical products. The Foreign Ministers also stressed that there should be positive cooperation in the area of commodities between ASEAN and Australia to resolve specific commodity issues such as market access, International Rubber Agreement (INRA II), international Tin Study Group (ITSG) and the development of resource-based industries in the ASEAN region.

52. In reviewing the ASEAN – Canada Dialogue relations, the Foreign Ministers noted with satisfaction the steady progress achieved in the cooperation between ASEAN and Canada, and expressed the view that further improvements could be made in the areas of trade and investment. They also expressed the view that the close consultations between ASEAN and Canadian senior trade officials in October 1988 on the MTN, the Canada-US Free Trade Agreement and other international economic issues had been beneficial and welcomed further consultations on these issues.

53. They noted that the ASEAN – Canada Economic Cooperation Agreement had been renewed for a further period of two years from 1 June 1989. They appreciated Canada’s continuing development assistance to ASEAN projects and its decision to increase its financial commitment to the ASEAN – Canada Regional Training Programme. They noted that the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on ASEAN – Canada Cooperation in the Ku Band Propagation Measurement Programme on Earth Space Paths was signed by Thailand, on behalf of ASEAN, and Canada in Bangkok on 5 June 1989.

54. The Foreign Ministers noted the successful conclusion of the Eighth Meeting of the ASEAN EC Joint Cooperation Committee (JCC), Brussels, 30 November – 1 December 1988. On international economic issues, the Foreign Ministers expressed concern on the adverse effects of the disagreement between the US and the EC over farm subsidies and the anti-tropical timber campaign in the developed countries which were gaining momentum and affecting trade in tropical products from the region. They noted the positive development in the area of trade and stressed the need for mutual interest and commitment to the strengthening of regional cooperation and the further liberalization of trade on a multilateral basis. The Foreign Ministers noted the EC’s assurances that the creation of a Single European Market in 1992 would lead to the improvement of the EC’s competitiveness, and would further stimulate the liberalization of international trade and services and contribute to sustain world economic growth. Despite the assurances of the EC the Foreign Ministers expressed concern over the possible adverse implications to ASEAN as a result of the Single European Market in 1992.

55. The Foreign ministers noted that the Eighth ASEAN-EC JCC had approved in principle, the Joint Memorandum on ASEAN – EC Industrial Co-operation. They also noted the launching of an EC financial facility to promote joint-ventures between EC firms and partners in some developing countries, including ASEAN, and hoped that the new financial facility would be instrumental to increasing the interest of European enterprises, especially small and medium-sized ones, in all forms of industrial cooperation in the ASEAN region. In the field of human resources development, the Foreign Ministers noted that the Agreement Establishing the ASEAN – EC Management Centre was in the process of being finalized.

56. The Foreign Ministers noted the outcome of the Tenth Meeting of ASEAN – Japan Forum, Tokyo, 21 – 22 September 1988. They expressed appreciation for the efforts of Japan to enhance ASEAN – Japan cooperation, noting in particular the launching of the ASEAN -Japan Development Fund (AJDF) and the unveiling of policies and programmes to promote and strengthen economic cooperation and cultural exchanges. However, the outstanding reservations of Brunei Darussalam and Singapore on the AJDF had not yet been resolved.

57. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the decision on Brunei Darussalam to become a party to the Agreement Establishing the ASEAN Promotion Centre (APC) on Trade, Investment and Tourism in Tokyo and to participate in the Japan Scholarship Fund for the ASEAN Youth.

58. The Foreign Ministers noted Japan’s positive economic policies to fully recognize the importance and expansion of ASEAN trade in commodities and actively support the efforts of the developing countries to overcome commodity problems. In ‘this regard, the Foreign Ministers noted that Japan took the initiative and decided to implement unilaterally an offer on tariff and import quota concessions affecting tropical and other products of interest to less developed countries. They also recognized the need to widen cooperation in the area of R & D on commodities to promote and diversify processing activities in the ASEAN countries. On the Uruguay Round the Foreign Ministers reiterated the need to enhance further ASEAN – Japan cooperation in order to maintain the momentum of the negotiations on tropical products and the improvement of the offer package.

59. The Foreign Ministers noted with satisfaction the outcome of the Ninth ASEAN – New Zealand Dialogue, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 23-24 November 1988. They expressed appreciation on the continued efforts of New Zealand to further enhance cooperation in various fields. They also noted the progress made by New Zealand in respect of the Inter-Institutional Linkages Programme (IILP) and Trade and Investment Promotion Package (TIPP). The Foreign Ministers expressed the hope that these programmes would be implemented as soon as possible as they would bring mutual benefits to both ASEAN and New Zealand.

60. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the agreement of both sides on private sector participation in activities in future dialogue meetings. They expressed concern over New Zealand’s Policy of product graduation which had affected ASEAN member countries. The Foreign Ministers expressed the hope that the New Zealand Government would give positive response to the ASEAN 5th Request List for Product Reinstatement for Brunei Darussalam and Singapore and ASEAN list of products for deeper cuts in its reviewed GSP Scheme. The Foreign Ministers also expressed their concern on the New Zealand Overseas Students Policy which would certainly impose a heavier financial burden to ASEAN students through its “users’ pay” system.

61. The Foreign Ministers expressed satisfaction with the progress made under the ASEAN – US Dialogue since last year and believed that under the new US Administration, ASEAN – US relations would continue to be firmly maintained and strengthened. The Foreign Ministers also expressed satisfaction on the completion of the Joint Study of the Economic Relationship between ASEAN and the US under the ASEAN – US Initiative (AUI). They noted that the findings, views and recommendations of the Study which were exclusively those of the researchers, would be considered by officials from ASEAN and the US, and hoped that the outcome would produce fruitful results to both sides. The Foreign Ministers also noted that the private investment and trade opportunities in PITO Project proposed by the US under the Future Development Cooperation Programme was under consideration by ASEAN. On international economic issues, the Foreign Ministers emphasized the need for an active participation of the US in the Uruguay Round to ensure that the desired results in the negotiations on agriculture and tropical products were achieved. The Foreign Ministers expressed the need for positive solutions to the adverse effects of the farm subsidy war and the anti-vegetable oils campaign.

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC ISSUES

62. In reviewing the international economic situation, the Foreign Ministers noted with concern the continued asymetrical interdependence between the developing and developed economies, as well as the adverse effects of macro economic policies of some developed countries on developing countries. There are indications that the progress made in the reductions of external imbalances is slowing down on the basis of current policies and exchange rates. The large fiscal and trade deficits in the US continued to threaten the stability of the international economy. The Foreign Ministers further noted that volatility in exchange rates of major currencies has serious adverse impact on international trade and the balance of payments and aggravates the debt problem of some ASEAN countries. It is therefore essential for industrial countries to coordinate action in the area of exchange rates in order to eliminate the disruptive effects of foreign exchange fluctuations. The underlying consideration should be for the promotion of strong anti sound growth in their economies.

63. The Foreign Ministers expressed their satisfaction with the agreement reached at the GATT Trade Negotiations Committee’s Meeting in Geneva from 5 to 8 April 1989 which has resolved the deadlock at the Mid-Term Review in Montreal last December, thus enabling the Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations to carry on. The Foreign Ministers also expressed satisfaction at the renewed and unqualified support given by the GATT contracting parties to the Principle of Special and Differential (S&D) treatment for developing countries as called for in the Punta del Este Declaration. On agriculture, they expressed the hope that the short-term elements for reform particularly those which would implement a standstill on current agricultural support and protection levels would eventually lead to substantive rollbacks and a possible dismantling of such trade distorting measures. The Foreign Ministers noted with satisfaction the crucial role played by the Cairns Group towards the resolution of the differences between the US and the EC which helped contributed to the compromise agreement on the issue of agriculture. They called upon all parties concern to maintain momentum of the progress achieved so far so that a global agricultural trade regime based on a fair and market-oriented trading system operating und6r the GATT discipline could be achieved. The Foreign Ministers were mindful that much hard bargaining still lay ahead, thus there was the need to maintain ASEAN unity and common purpose during the coming months- They reiterated ASEAN’s intention to participate constructively in the negotiations on the new issues, that is, Trade-Related Aspects on Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), Trade Related Investment Measures (TRIMS) and Services, taking fully into consideration the implications that might affect ASEAN’s international trade and development.

64. In the area of tropical products, the Foreign Ministers expressed the hope that continued concessions on market access would be made, focussing on wider coverage of products, deeper tariff cuts and immediate attention to reducing tariff escalation on semi-processed and processed tropical products. The Foreign Ministers reiterated the need to continue playing an active role to maintain the momentum of the negotiations for the remainder of the current Round and constructively review the offer package on tropical products as well as to urge the other countries, which had not made their offer, to do so. They also expressed the hope of continued progress of negotiations in the areas of safeguards, dispute settlement, tariff and non-tariff measures and functioning of the GATT System.

65. The Foreign Ministers remained committed to ensuring progress in the Uruguay Round. On agriculture, the Foreign Ministers reassured the Contracting Parties that ASEAN would continue to play an active role in the Cairns Group. They hoped that the current negotiations would succeed in establishing an agricultural trading regime that was more responsive to international market signals under the strengthened and more operationally effective GATT rules and disciplines. Towards this objective, ASEAN agreed to the Cairns Group proposal to urge the EC and the US to implement progressive substantial reductions of all trade distortive agricultural support and protection measures.

66. The Foreign Ministers expressed concern on the emergence of trading blocs and other regional economic arrangements as well as the increased tendency to resort to bilateral measures in settling trade problems. They expressed the view that an open multilateral trading system operating under the GATT framework must be preserved as it ensured the survival of a fair, equitable and healthy international trading environment. They called upon all countries to support the GATT system and make greater efforts in the Uruguay Round.

67. The Foreign Ministers viewed the external debt problem-of the developing countries as a critical issue of international concern. They reiterated that new financing flows from creditors was needed to sustain the improvement in growth. In particular, sustained implementation of growth oriented policy reforms and improvements in the investment climate were important. They noted with concern the resource constraint on development in many developing countries, inadequate export earnings, arising from the slow growth of markets, from barriers to access to those markets and from low commodity prices, had been corn pounded by the decline of commercial credits and the low level of official development assistance. As a result, they observed that several developing countries had become net exporters of financial resources, a situation which was clearly not sustainable. Therefore, they welcomed the coordinated efforts of industrialized-countries and multilateral institutions to expand substantially the flow of concessional resources for development of the region. The Multilateral Assistance Initiative for the Philippines had provided a framework for mutually beneficial endeavours between donors and developing countries.

68. On the global debt problem, the Foreign Ministers welcomed recent initiatives taken by industrialized countries in addressing this issue such as those taken by the Toronto Summit in 1988. They expressed the hope that official creditors could consider debt relief for heavily indebted countries presently precluded from Toronto terms, inspite of their per capita income being slightly above that of those currently eligible, as well as to those countries which had consistently honoured their obligations. They also expressed appreciation for actions taken by the IMF and the World Bank in providing additional sources for the reduction of debt stock and service through market-oriented approaches. Incremental support from other resources like the ADB and bilateral creditors would be welcomed. The Foreign Ministers reiterated their belief that cooperation of governments, multilateral financial institutions and commercial creditors would be essential for the effective resolution of global debt burden.

69. On the international commodity issues, the Foreign Ministers reiterated their concern on the proliferation of protectioni5M in the industrialized countries, the worsening of the anti-tropical vegetable oils and anti-tropical timber smear campaigns propagated by the Non-Government Organizations (NG05) in certain Western nations, as well as the escalation of the farm subsidy war between the major economic powers. The Foreign Ministers called upon the countries concerned to coordinate their action to bring about further liberalization of world trade in commodities and take 5teps to end the smear campaigns and the farm subsidy war which had the effect of reducing the exports of ASEAN commodities.

70. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the entry into force of the Common Fund for Commodities on 19 June 1989. The Foreign Ministers reaffirmed the ASEAN endorsement of the Indonesian candidature of H.E. Ambassador Budi Hartantyo for the post of the Managing Director of the Common Fund. The Foreign Ministers also noted the progress made towards the ITSG and the successful conclusion of INRA II which augured well for cooperation among the producing consuming countries.

DISARMAMENT

71. The Foreign Ministers expressed their grave concern over the continuing world-wide escalation of the arms race which affects the pace and security of all nations. They were of the view that the effectiveness of all efforts to achieve genuine disarmament requires sincere cooperation among all states, especially the two superpowers, and believed that the progress in this field could enhance the goal of disarmament in favour of development.

72. They welcomed the results of the Paris Conference of State Parties to the 1925 Geneva Protocol and Other Interested Parties in January 1989 and expressed the hope that the ongoing negotiations for a Comprehensive Convention banning chemical weapons in Geneva would be concluded soon. They also noted with satisfaction the signing of the agreement on the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) and the convening of the talks on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) between NATO and the Warsaw Treaty Organisation in Vienna. In this respect they considered the recent proposals and counter proposals between the Presidents of Soviet Union and United States to reduce their respective conventional forces as positive steps that should be encouraged.

73. In noting that the ratification of the INF Treaty had lessened tension between the two superpowers, the Foreign Ministers called on both sides to pursue their commitment to reduce the strategic Nuclear Weapons at the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START). The Foreign Ministers also called on the superpowers to begin negotiations to eliminate their Short Range Nuclear Forces (SNF) immediately. The Foreign Ministers also urged the superpowers to continue efforts towards establishing a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.

74. The Foreign Ministers expressed their deep regret that the concluded Third Special Session of the General Assembly devoted to Disarmament (SSOD II 1) failed to adopt a final document of the Conference.

WEST ASIA

75. The Foreign Ministers viewed with concern the unresolved Arab-Israeli conflict. They reiterated their full support for the legitimate struggle of the Palestinian people to exercise their inalienable rights, including the right to self-determination, and the restoration of Arab sovereignty over their occupied territories. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the Declaration of Independence and the Political Programme adopted by the Palestinian National Council at its 19th Extraordinary session held in Algiers last year. The Foreign Ministers called for renewed efforts to achieve a just, comprehensive and lasting settlement by negotiations. Towards this end, they expressed support for the convening of the International Peace Conference on the Middle East under the auspices of the UN with the full participation of the PLO. The Foreign Ministers took note of the continuing uprising in the occupied territories and were of the view that it underlined the need for an early settlement.

76. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the decision made by Iraq and Iran in accepting the United Nations Security Council Resolution 598 of 1987. The Foreign Ministers called on both parties concerned to abide by the terms of the ceasefire agreement and to increase efforts in their negotiations to reach a peaceful settlement of the conflict in accordance with the provisions of Resolution 598.

AFGHANISTAN

77. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the total withdrawal of the Soviet troops from Afghanistan as a result of the signing of the Geneva Accords.

78. The Foreign Ministers, however, expressed their concern on the continued fighting after the Soviet withdrawal and hope that the parties concerned would reach a comprehensive political settlement and create favourable conditions conducive to a safe return of all Afghan refugees to their homeland. In this connection, the Foreign Ministers expressed the hope for renewed efforts to achieve a just, comprehensive and lasting settlement.

SITUATION IN SOUTHERN AFRICA

79. The Foreign Ministers expressed their grave concern at the continuing state of conflict in Southern Africa. They reaffirmed their condemnation of apartheid which they considered inhuman and a root cause to the conflict in the region. The perpetration of genocide at home and the practice of state terrorism abroad were inherent in the system of apartheid. The Foreign Ministers therefore reiterated that there could be no peace and stability in Southern Africa until and unless the system of apartheid is totally eliminated.

80. The Foreign Ministers welcomed the commencement of the implementation of the United Nations Independence Plan for Namibia on 1 April 1989 in accordance with the United Nations Security Council Resolution 435 (1978). They expressed their solidarity with the African people in their just struggle for liberation and justice and demanded the early release of African nationalists in South Africa including Nelson Mandela. They noted that the existing economic and other sanctions against South Africa adopted by the international community had already had a significant effect on South Africa and called for their wider, tighter and more intensified application.

ASIA PACIFIC COOPERATION

81. The Foreign Ministers noted the recent trends and developments in the Asia-Pacific region and in particular the proposals made by some of the Dialogue Countries for enhanced economic cooperation.

ASEAN SECRETARIAT

82. The Foreign Ministers approved the budget of the ASEAN Secretariat for the financial year 1989/90.

83. The Foreign Ministers appointed His Excellency, Mr. Rusli Noor, as the Secretary-General of the ASEAN Secretariat for a period of three years, with effect from 16 July 1989.

84. The Foreign Ministers expressed their profound appreciation to the outgoing Secretary-General of the ASEAN Secretariat, His Excellency, Mr. Roderick Yong of Brunei Darussalam for his excellent and exemplary service to ASEAN and his invaluable contributions to the strengthening, effectiveness and efficiency of the ASEAN Secretariat during his tenure.

TWENTY-THIRD ASEAN MINISTERIAL MEETING

85. The Foreign Ministers agreed that the Twenty-Third ASEAN Ministerial Meeting would be held in Jakarta in July 1990.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

86. The Delegations of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand expressed their sincere and deep appreciation to the Government and people of Brunei Darussalam for their warm and generous hospitality and the excellent facilities and efficient arrangement made for the Meeting.

87. The Meeting was held in the traditional spirit of ASEAN friendship and solidarity.a